enterprise effectiveness

The Engagement Gap

We define employee engagement (a term that is widely used and misused) as an employees’ willingness and ability to contribute to company success. And the current level of employee engagement isn’t good.

An excerpt from Gary Hamel’s blog at the Wall Street Journal, entitled Management’s Dirty Little Secret:

“Consider the recent “Global Workforce Survey” conducted by Towers Perrin (now Towers Watson), an HR consultancy. In an attempt to measure the extent of employee engagement around the world, the company polled more than 90,000 workers in 18 countries. The survey covered many of the key factors that determine workplace engagement, including: the ability to participate in decision-making, the encouragement given for innovative thinking, the availability of skill-enhancing job assignments and the interest shown by senior executives in employee well-being.

Below you’ll find some supporting graphics taken directly from Towers Watson’s most recent (2012) instalment of the study:

 

TW_Workforce2012.png

Unfortunately, these results aren’t uncommon or new. Peter Drucker was quoted some time ago as saying, “Most of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get their work done.”

But the path to addressing this problem is under our control according to research conducted by Teresa M. Amabile and Stephen J. Kramer:

“Ask leaders what they think makes employees enthusiastic about work, and they’ll tell you in no uncertain terms. In a recent survey we invited more than 600 managers from dozens of companies to rank the impact on employee motivation and emotions of five workplace factors commonly considered significant: recognition, incentives, interpersonal support, support for making progress, and clear goals. “Recognition for good work (either public or private)” came out number one.
Unfortunately, those managers are wrong.
Having just completed a multiyear study tracking the day-to-day activities, emotions, and motivation levels of hundreds of knowledge workers in a wide variety of settings, we now know what the top motivator of performance is—and, amazingly, it’s the factor those survey participants ranked dead last. It’s progress. On days when workers have the sense they’re making headway in their jobs, or when they receive support that helps them overcome obstacles, their emotions are most positive and their drive to succeed is at its peak. On days when they feel they are spinning their wheels or encountering roadblocks to meaningful accomplishment, their moods and motivation are lowest. 
GreatWorkday_Amabile.gif
“You can proactively create both the perception and the reality of progress. If you are a high-ranking manager, take great care to clarify overall goals, ensure that people’s efforts are properly supported, and refrain from exerting time pressure so intense that minor glitches are perceived as crises rather than learning opportunities.
Cultivate a culture of helpfulness. While you’re at it, you can facilitate progress in a more direct way: Roll up your sleeves and pitch in. Of course, all these efforts will not only keep people working with gusto but also get the job done faster.”

Teresa M. Amabile is the Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. Steven J. Kramer is an independent researcher and writer based in Wayland, Massachusetts

In short, we believe Towers Waston summarized it best in their report:

Companies are running 21st-century businesses with 20th-century workplace practices and programs. 

 

beacon and the Engagement Gap

How does beacon help battle the Engagement Gap? We simplify, support and automate a set of complementary, evidence-based, high-performance work practices, which includes; ensuring that goals are clear, people’s efforts are properly supported, progress is easy to measure and see, and that collaboration occurs to execute the most important work.

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Death By Growth

There is no easy way to say this, organizations don't scale well using traditional management practices. In fact, the returns on productivity for adding more people are actually sublinear; which means adding a person doesn't get you a full person's contribution. Just listen to what Geoffrey West, Distinguished Professor and Past President of the Sante Fe Institute has to say about it:

"After buying data on more than 23,000 publicly traded companies, Bettencourt and West discovered that corporate productivity, unlike urban productivity, was entirely sublinear. As the number of employees grows, the amount of profit per employee shrinks. West gets giddy when he shows me the linear regression charts. "Look at this bloody plot," he says. "It's ridiculous how well the points line up." The graph reflects the bleak reality of corporate growth, in which efficiencies of scale are almost always outweighed by the burdens of bureaucracy. "When a company starts out, it's all about the new idea," West says. "And then, if the company gets lucky, the idea takes off. Everybody is happy and rich. But then management starts worrying about the bottom line, and so all these people are hired to keep track of the paper clips. This is the beginning of the end."
The danger, West says, is that the inevitable decline in profit per employee makes large companies increasingly vulnerable to market volatility. Since the company now has to support an expensive staff -- overhead costs increase with size -- even a minor disturbance can lead to significant losses. As West puts it, "Companies are killed by their need to keep on getting bigger."

TalentAsProfitDriver.png

As the graphic, excerpted from a McKinsey study, illustrates exactly what West and Bettencourt found. As companies grow, their profit per employee drops. Yes, these are very large enterprises. Does this occur on a smaller scale? Our first-hand experience working with enterprises as small as 25 would indicate it does.

The next obvious question is how can you contain the "burdens of bureaucracy" so growth doesn't kill your organization? If so, how?

Something to consider as you grow your team or enterprise.

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