Okay, Bosses Suck. But Why?

There have been some fairly depressing findings being published over the last couple years about the failure of managers/bosses in business. One such study undertaken by Michelle McQuaid was particularly bleak.

The study found that: 

  • Only 36% of Americans are happy at their job.
  • 65% say a better boss would make them happy while 35% choose a pay raise
  • 31% of employees polled feel uninspired and unappreciated by their boss, and close to 15% feel downright miserable, bored and lonely.
  • Only 38% of those polled describe their boss as “great,” with 42% saying their bosses don’t work very hard and close to 20% saying their boss has little or no integrity.
  • Close to 60% of Americans say they would do a better job if they got along better with their boss.
  • Close to 70% of those polled said they would be happier at work if they got along better with their boss, with the breakdown equal amongst men and women, but younger workers in their 20s and 30s skewed even higher (80%).
  • Over half (55%) of those polled, think they would be more successful in their career if they got along better with their boss, with 58% in managerial and professional careers saying so, and only 53% in service and manual labor positions feeling that way.
  •  In terms of the impact a boss has on employee health, 73% of those in their 20s and 30s said their health is at stake, while only 40% of those 50 and older felt that way.
  • When stress levels rise at work, a disturbing 47% say their boss does not stay calm and in control. Although 70% of boomers polled say their boss doesn’t lose his/her cool in times of stress.
  • Only 38% of Americans will thank their boss on National Bosses Day with most believing that their boss wouldn't care enough to bother. Close to 10% said they would use the day as an opportunity to talk to their boss and improve the relationship.

Studies like this are important in identifying and baselining the situation at work. Clearly there is much to be done. But I can't help but think that rather than blaming "bosses" and working to avoid them or "manage" them, that we need to think about the systemic reasons why they are failing their teams? What are the root causes?

If we understand the root causes, perhaps we can help change the conditions for managers and the managed? Rather than just creating strategies for finding a less-crappy manager.

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